Webcasts

Webcasts 2018-12-14T14:56:01+00:00
Will You Still Love Me When I Turn 64GFC?
Will You Still Love Me When I Turn 64GFC?
Dean Wallace – Marvell Technology Group
Barry Maskas – HPE

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here for the Q&A Blog

Fibre Channel’s speed roadmap defines a well-understood technological trend: the need to double the bit rate in the channel without doubling the required bandwidth.

In order to do this, PAM4 (pulse-amplitude modulation, with four levels of pulse modulation), enters the Fibre Channel physical layer picture. With the use of four signal levels instead of two, and with each signal level corresponding to a two-bit symbol, the standards define 64GFC operation while maintaining backward compatibility with 32GFC and 16GFC.

This advanced technical session will cover the T11 standards which define 64GFC serial Fibre Channel, backwards speed auto-negotiation compatibility, and compatible form factors:

•New physical layer and specification challenges for PAM4, which includes eye openings, crosstalk sensitivity, and new test methodologies and parameters
•Transceivers, their form factors, and how 64GFC maintains backward compatibility with multi-mode fibre cable deployments in the data center, including distance specifications
•Discussion of protocol changes, and an overview of backward-compatible link speed and forward error correction (FEC) negotiation
•The FCIA’s Fibre Channel speed roadmap and evolution, and new technologies under consideration

Expand the Power of Flash with FC-NVMe
Expand the Power of Flash with FC-NVMe
Mark Jones – Broadcom
Craig Carlson – Marvell Semiconductor
Rupin Mohan – HPE
David Rodgers – Teledyne LeCroy
Marcus Thordal – Broadcom
Dennis Martin – Principled Technologies

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Q&A Blog coming soon!

Flash is really fast, and performance-hungry applications must be able to access it wherever it is located. Luckily, NVMe can take advantage of flash throughout a computer system. 

However, accessing flash over a network can introduce problems which designers must solve. Accesses can take much longer than local flash, latency can rise significantly, networking issues can raise their ugly heads, and performance can vary greatly depending on network load and competition for resources.

Ways to solve such problems include sequence-level error recovery, prioritization for virtualized environments, and improved forward error correction. And – surprise! – all these are already part of the Fibre Channel standard or the emerging FC-NVMe transport protocol.

Protocol Analysis for High-Speed Fibre Channel Fabrics
Protocol Analysis for High-Speed Fibre Channel Fabrics
David Rodgers – FCIA and Teledyne LeCroy
Yamini Shastry – Viavi Solutions
Joseph Kimpler – ATTO Technologies

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here for the Q&A Blog

The growth and centralization of mission critical datacenter SAN environments has exposed the fact that many small yet seemingly insignificant problems have the potential of becoming large scale and impactful events, unless properly contained or controlled. Root cause analysis requirements now encompass all layers of the fabric architecture, and new storage protocols that usurp the traditional network stack (i.e. FCoE, iWARP, NVMe over Fabrics, etc.) for purposes of expedited data delivery place additional analytical demands on the datacenter manager. To be sure, all tools have limitations in their effectiveness and areas of coverage, so a well-constructed “collage” of best practices and effective and efficient analysis tools must be developed. To that end, recognizing and reducing the effect of those limitations is essential.

This webcast introduces Protocol Analysis tools and how they may be incorporated into the “best practices” application of SAN problem solving.  We will review:

  • The protocol of the Phy
  • Use of “in-line” capture tools
  • Benefits of purposeful error injection for developing and supporting today’s high-speed Fibre Channel storage fabrics

Learn how you can save your SAN (and your sanity!)

Fibre Channel Interoperability
Fibre Channel Interoperability
Barry Maskas – HPE
Tim Sheehan – University of New Hampshire Interoperability Lab
David Rodgers – Teledyne LeCroy

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here for the Q&A Blog

Interoperability is a primary basis for the predictable behavior of a fibre channel (FC) SAN.  FC interoperability implies standards conformance by definition. Interoperability also implies exchanges between a range of products, or similar products from one or more different suppliers, or even between past and future revisions of the same products. Interoperability may be developed as a special measure between two products, while excluding the rest, and still be standards conformant. When a supplier is forced to adapt its system to a system that is not based on standards, it is not interoperability but rather, only compatibility.

In this webcast, FCIA experts delve into the many dimensions of FC interoperability, discussing:

  • Standards and conformance
  • Validation of conformance and interoperability
  • FC-NVMe conformance and interoperability
  • Interoperability matrices
  • Multi-generational interoperability
  • Use case examples of interoperability
FICON 101
FICON 101
Patty Driever – IBM
Howard Johnson – Broadcom Limited

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here for the Q&A Blog

FICON (Fibre Channel Connection) is an upper-level protocol supported by mainframe servers and attached enterprise-class storage controllers that utilize Fibre Channel as the underlying transport.  Mainframes are built to provide a robust and resilient IT infrastructure, and FICON is a key element of their ability to meet the increasing demands placed on reliable and efficient access to data.  What are some of the key objectives and benefits of the FICON protocol?  And what are the characteristics that make FICON relevant in today’s datacenters for mission-critical workloads?

In this webcast you’ll learn:

  • The world of the mainframe
  • The characteristics of mainframe I/O and FICON architecture
  • Key features and benefits of FICON
Fibre Channel Cabling
Fibre Channel Cabling
Mark Jones – Broadcom Limited
Greg McSorley – Amphenol Corporation
Zach Nason – Data Center Systems

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here for the Questions & Answers blog

Looking for more cost-effective ways to implement fibre channel cabling? At this webcast you will learn why proper cabling is important and how it fits into data center designs. FCIA experts discuss:

  • Cable and connector types, cassettes, patch panels and other cabling products
  • Variables in Fiber Optic and Copper Cables: Reflectance, Insertion Loss, Crosstalk, Speed/Length Limitations and more
  • Different variations of Structured Cabling in an environment with FC
  • Helpful tips when planning and implementing a cabling infrastructure within a SAN
  • Data center infrastructure layout examples
Fibre Channel Performance: Congestion, Slow Drain, and Over-Utilization, Oh My!
Fibre Channel Performance: Congestion, Slow Drain, and Over-Utilization, Oh My!
Ed Mazurek – Cisco
Earl Apellanes – Broadcom
David J. Rodgers – Teledyne LeCroy

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here to view the Questions & Answers blog

Today’s Fibre Channel SANs are tasked with reliably delivering huge amounts of data with almost zero latency in an environment with a large variance of end device capabilities. Fibre Channel is a lossless network protocol, but what are the ramifications? What is considered a good SAN design and what are best practices? What situations can lead to suboptimal performance? How can a device that is not performing well affect the performance of devices even on different parts of the SAN? Can a device that is returning credits without delay affect the SAN just like a device that is returning credits slowly? This webcast provides the answers to these questions and more. For answers, join the FCIA on February 6th for our live webcast.

FCIP (Extension): Data Protection and Business Continuity
FCIP (Extension): Data Protection and Business Continuity
Mark Detrick – Brocade/Broadcom
Rupin Mohan – HPE

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here to view the Questions & Answers blog

Disaster may strike anywhere and occurs in many shapes and sizes. Transporting data over significant distance beyond the reach of a threatening event preserves data so organizations can rapidly recover in the event of a site going down.

This makes deploying a disaster recovery infrastructure between data centers with fast, continuous, and easy replication of mission-critical data to anywhere in the world essential. Fibre Channel over IP (FCIP), often referred to as “Extension,” is used to connect SANs across distance using IP networks. FCIP is commonly used for Remote Data Replication (RDR) between Enterprise Storage Arrays and Remote Tape applications, for the purpose of Business Continuance via Disaster Recovery (BC/DR). This webcast covers best known methods for deployment with extension architectures, extension in routed topologies, and performance optimization for remote replication.

Understanding Long-Distance Fibre Channel
Understanding Long-Distance Fibre Channel
J Metz – Cisco
Mark Allen – Cisco

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar

As people learn more about Fibre Channel and are curious about NVMe over Fibre Channel (FC-NVMe), questions arise around how storage solutions are going to be affected by the new technology. Perhaps the least understood aspect of storage networks involves distance solutions. In this webcast, FCIA experts highlight Fibre Channel long distance use cases and answer the most common questions to help viewers better understand and plan for distance solutions using Fibre Channel.

Dive Deep into NVMe over Fibre Channel (FC-NVMe)
Dive Deep into NVMe over Fibre Channel (FC-NVMe)
Curt Beckmann – Brocade
Craig Carlson – Cavium
J Metz – Cisco

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here to view the Questions & Answers blog

As FC-NVMe (NVMe over Fibre Channel) is preparing for it’s official launch, there have been numerous questions about how the technology works, how it gets implemented, and what makes it special when compared to traditional, SCSI-based Fibre Channel. This webcast is an advanced, deep dive of the bits and bytes of FC-NVMe.

Fibre Channel Fundamentals
Fibre Channel Fundamentals
Rupin Mohan – HPE
Earl Apellanes – Brocade

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here to view the Questions & Answers blog

Fibre Channel (FC) is the storage networking protocol for enterprise data centers with over 11 million ports deployed. Fibre Channel is purpose-built–and engineered to meet the demands for enterprise data centers that require rock solid reliability, high performance and scalability. It can even transport new storage protocols like NVMe natively. This webcast explains how FC provides unparalleled performance for storage systems.

How to use the Fibre Channel Speedmap
How to use the Fibre Channel Speedmap
Tony Bourke
Dave Alexande
J Metz

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar

Fibre Channel is the most well known dedicated storage networking protocol in use in data centers today, and is considered the gold standard for storage in terms of availability, reliability, and scalability. However, it does require some specific design and planning requirements. For that, storage administrators use the Fibre Channel Speedmap. Watch this on-demand webcast to learn how to use the Fibre Channel Speedmap, what the numbers mean, and why its useful.

Introducing Fibre Channel NVMe: The Best of Both Worlds
Introducing Fibre Channel NVMe: The Best of Both Worlds
J Metz – FCIA Board of Directors, Cisco
Craig Carlson – FCIA Board of Directors, Cavium

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here to view the Questions & Answers blog

NVMe is one of the most interesting new developments to happen to storage in the past several years, and NVMe over Fabrics extends these capabilities over a Storage Area Network. Given that 80% of all existing Flash storage solutions deployed are interconnected with Fibre Channel, many questions have arisen about what it is, how it works, and why someone might want to consider using Fibre Channel for NVMe-based solutions.  Watch this on-demand webcast to learn more about this exciting new technology from the people who are developing it.

Protocol Analysis for High-Speed Fibre Channel Fabrics
Protocol Analysis for High-Speed Fibre Channel Fabrics
David Rodgers – FCIA and Teledyne LeCroy
Yamini Shastry – Viavi Solutions
Joseph Kimpler – ATTO Technologies

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here to for the Q&A Blog

The growth and centralization of mission critical datacenter SAN environments has exposed the fact that many small yet seemingly insignificant problems have the potential of becoming large scale and impactful events, unless properly contained or controlled. Root cause analysis requirements now encompass all layers of the fabric architecture, and new storage protocols that usurp the traditional network stack (i.e. FCoE, iWARP, NVMe over Fabrics, etc.) for purposes of expedited data delivery place additional analytical demands on the datacenter manager. To be sure, all tools have limitations in their effectiveness and areas of coverage, so a well-constructed “collage” of best practices and effective and efficient analysis tools must be developed. To that end, recognizing and reducing the effect of those limitations is essential.

This webcast introduces Protocol Analysis tools and how they may be incorporated into the “best practices” application of SAN problem solving.  We will review:

  • The protocol of the Phy
  • Use of “in-line” capture tools
  • Benefits of purposeful error injection for developing and supporting today’s high-speed Fibre Channel storage fabrics

Learn how you can save your SAN (and your sanity!)

Fibre Channel Interoperability
Fibre Channel Interoperability
Barry Maskas – HPE
Tim Sheehan – University of New Hampshire Interoperability Lab
David Rodgers – Teledyne LeCroy

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here for the Q&A Blog

Interoperability is a primary basis for the predictable behavior of a fibre channel (FC) SAN.  FC interoperability implies standards conformance by definition. Interoperability also implies exchanges between a range of products, or similar products from one or more different suppliers, or even between past and future revisions of the same products. Interoperability may be developed as a special measure between two products, while excluding the rest, and still be standards conformant. When a supplier is forced to adapt its system to a system that is not based on standards, it is not interoperability but rather, only compatibility.

In this webcast, FCIA experts delve into the many dimensions of FC interoperability, discussing:

  • Standards and conformance
  • Validation of conformance and interoperability
  • FC-NVMe conformance and interoperability
  • Interoperability matrices
  • Multi-generational interoperability
  • Use case examples of interoperability
FICON 101
FICON 101
Patty Driever – IBM
Howard Johnson – Broadcom Limited

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here for the Q&A Blog

FICON (Fibre Channel Connection) is an upper-level protocol supported by mainframe servers and attached enterprise-class storage controllers that utilize Fibre Channel as the underlying transport.  Mainframes are built to provide a robust and resilient IT infrastructure, and FICON is a key element of their ability to meet the increasing demands placed on reliable and efficient access to data.  What are some of the key objectives and benefits of the FICON protocol?  And what are the characteristics that make FICON relevant in today’s datacenters for mission-critical workloads?

In this webcast you’ll learn:

  • The world of the mainframe
  • The characteristics of mainframe I/O and FICON architecture
  • Key features and benefits of FICON
Fibre Channel Cabling
Fibre Channel Cabling
Mark Jones – Broadcom Limited
Greg McSorley – Amphenol Corporation
Zach Nason – Data Center Systems

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here for the Questions & Answers blog

Looking for more cost-effective ways to implement fibre channel cabling? At this webcast you will learn why proper cabling is important and how it fits into data center designs. FCIA experts discuss:

  • Cable and connector types, cassettes, patch panels and other cabling products
  • Variables in Fiber Optic and Copper Cables: Reflectance, Insertion Loss, Crosstalk, Speed/Length Limitations and more
  • Different variations of Structured Cabling in an environment with FC
  • Helpful tips when planning and implementing a cabling infrastructure within a SAN
  • Data center infrastructure layout examples
Fibre Channel Performance: Congestion, Slow Drain, and Over-Utilization, Oh My!
Fibre Channel Performance: Congestion, Slow Drain, and Over-Utilization, Oh My!
Ed Mazurek – Cisco
Earl Apellanes – Broadcom
David J. Rodgers – Teledyne LeCroy

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here to view the Questions & Answers blog

Today’s Fibre Channel SANs are tasked with reliably delivering huge amounts of data with almost zero latency in an environment with a large variance of end device capabilities. Fibre Channel is a lossless network protocol, but what are the ramifications? What is considered a good SAN design and what are best practices? What situations can lead to suboptimal performance? How can a device that is not performing well affect the performance of devices even on different parts of the SAN? Can a device that is returning credits without delay affect the SAN just like a device that is returning credits slowly? This webcast provides the answers to these questions and more. For answers, join the FCIA on February 6th for our live webcast.

FCIP (Extension): Data Protection and Business Continuity
FCIP (Extension): Data Protection and Business Continuity
Mark Detrick – Brocade/Broadcom
Rupin Mohan – HPE

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here to view the Questions & Answers blog

Disaster may strike anywhere and occurs in many shapes and sizes. Transporting data over significant distance beyond the reach of a threatening event preserves data so organizations can rapidly recover in the event of a site going down.

This makes deploying a disaster recovery infrastructure between data centers with fast, continuous, and easy replication of mission-critical data to anywhere in the world essential. Fibre Channel over IP (FCIP), often referred to as “Extension,” is used to connect SANs across distance using IP networks. FCIP is commonly used for Remote Data Replication (RDR) between Enterprise Storage Arrays and Remote Tape applications, for the purpose of Business Continuance via Disaster Recovery (BC/DR). This webcast covers best known methods for deployment with extension architectures, extension in routed topologies, and performance optimization for remote replication.

Understanding Long-Distance Fibre Channel
Understanding Long-Distance Fibre Channel
J Metz – Cisco
Mark Allen – Cisco

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar

As people learn more about Fibre Channel and are curious about NVMe over Fibre Channel (FC-NVMe), questions arise around how storage solutions are going to be affected by the new technology. Perhaps the least understood aspect of storage networks involves distance solutions. In this webcast, FCIA experts highlight Fibre Channel long distance use cases and answer the most common questions to help viewers better understand and plan for distance solutions using Fibre Channel.

Dive Deep into NVMe over Fibre Channel (FC-NVMe)
Dive Deep into NVMe over Fibre Channel (FC-NVMe)
Curt Beckmann – Brocade
Craig Carlson – Cavium
J Metz – Cisco

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here to view the Questions & Answers blog

As FC-NVMe (NVMe over Fibre Channel) is preparing for it’s official launch, there have been numerous questions about how the technology works, how it gets implemented, and what makes it special when compared to traditional, SCSI-based Fibre Channel. This webcast is an advanced, deep dive of the bits and bytes of FC-NVMe.

Fibre Channel Fundamentals
Fibre Channel Fundamentals
Rupin Mohan – HPE
Earl Apellanes – Brocade

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here to view the Questions & Answers blog

Fibre Channel (FC) is the storage networking protocol for enterprise data centers with over 11 million ports deployed. Fibre Channel is purpose-built–and engineered to meet the demands for enterprise data centers that require rock solid reliability, high performance and scalability. It can even transport new storage protocols like NVMe natively. This webcast explains how FC provides unparalleled performance for storage systems.

How to use the Fibre Channel Speedmap
How to use the Fibre Channel Speedmap
Tony Bourke
Dave Alexande
J Metz

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar

Fibre Channel is the most well known dedicated storage networking protocol in use in data centers today, and is considered the gold standard for storage in terms of availability, reliability, and scalability. However, it does require some specific design and planning requirements. For that, storage administrators use the Fibre Channel Speedmap. Watch this on-demand webcast to learn how to use the Fibre Channel Speedmap, what the numbers mean, and why its useful.

Introducing Fibre Channel NVMe: The Best of Both Worlds
Introducing Fibre Channel NVMe: The Best of Both Worlds
J Metz – FCIA Board of Directors, Cisco
Craig Carlson – FCIA Board of Directors, Cavium

Click here to download a PDF of the webcast slides
Click here to view the webinar
Click here to view the Questions & Answers blog

NVMe is one of the most interesting new developments to happen to storage in the past several years, and NVMe over Fabrics extends these capabilities over a Storage Area Network. Given that 80% of all existing Flash storage solutions deployed are interconnected with Fibre Channel, many questions have arisen about what it is, how it works, and why someone might want to consider using Fibre Channel for NVMe-based solutions.  Watch this on-demand webcast to learn more about this exciting new technology from the people who are developing it.

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